Famous Scientists

10 Most Famous Scientific Theories That Were Later Debunked

Author: Admin

The most genuine merit of science is probably its readiness to admit if it preaches or reveals something wrong. The therios in science are always being reconsidered and scrutinized. Modern research often rejects old ideas, hoaxes and myths.

Today’s post on our Science Blog will discuss ten of the most popular and influential scientific discoveries that were based on dubious data, and were consequently proven wrong, debunked and replaced with more reliable and logical modern theories.

1- Fleischmann–Pons’s Nuclear Fusion

Cold fusion is a supposed kind of nuclear reaction that would occur at relatively low temperatures compared with hot fusion. As a new type of nuclear reaction, it gained much popularity after reports in 1989 by famous electrochemists Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann. The craze about cold fusion became weaker as other scientists, after trying to repeat the experiment, failed to get similar results.

2- Phrenology

Now widely considered as a pseudoscience, phrenology was the study of the shape of skull as indicative of the strengths of different faculties. Modern scientific research wiped it out by proving that personality traits could not be traced to specific portions of the brain.

3- The Blank Slate

The Blank Slate theory (or Tabula rasa), widely popularized by John Locke in 1689, proposed that individuals are born without built-in mental content and that their knowledge comes from experience and perception. Modern research suggests that genes and other family traits inherited from birth, along with innate instincts of course, also play a very important role.

4- Luminiferous Aether

The aether (or ether) was a mysterious substance that was thought to transmit light through the universe. The idea of a luminiferous aether was debunked as experiments in the diffraction and refraction of light, and later Einstein’s special theory of relativity, came along and entirely revolutionized physics.

5- Einstein’s Static (or Stationary) Universe

A static universe, also called a “stationary” or “Einstein” universe, was a model proposed by Albert Einstein in 1917. It was problematic from the beginning. Edwin Hubble’s discovery of the relationship between red shift obliterated it by completely demonstrating that the universe is constantly expanding.

6- Martian Canals

The Martian canals were a network of gullies and ravines that some 19th century scientists erroneously thought to exist on Mars. First detected in 1877 by Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli, modern telescopes and imaging technology completely debunked the myth. The “canals” were actually found to be a mere optical illusion.

7- Phlogiston Theory

First postulated in 1667 by German physician Johann Joachim Becher, Phlogiston Theory is an obsolete scientific theory regarding the existence of “phlogiston”, a fire-like element, which was contained within combustible bodies and released during combustion. The theory tried to explain burning processes such as combustion and the rusting of metals, which are now jointly termed as “oxidation”.

8- The Expanding or Growing Earth

The Expanding Earth or Growing Earth is a hypothesis suggesting that the position and relative movement of continents is dependent on the volume of the Earth increasing. Modern science has turned down any expansion or contraction of the Earth.

9- Discovery of the Planet Vulcan

A small planet that was supposed to exist in an orbit between Mercury and the Sun, French mathematician Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier coined the name “Vulcan” while trying to explain the nature of Mercury’s orbit. No such planet was ever discovered, while the orbit of Mercury was explained in detail by Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

10- Spontaneous (or Equivocal) Generation

Spontaneous generation or equivocal generation is an obsolete principle concerning the origin of life from inanimate matter. The hypothesis was brought out by Aristotle who advocated the work of earlier natural philosophers. It was proven wrong in the 19th century by the experiments of Louis Pasteur, drawing influence from Francesco Redi who was an early proponent of germ theory and cell theory.

25 Famous Scientists Who Believed in God

Author: Admin

So how did the universe begin? How did life arise on Earth? These have been mankind’s most important questions through the ages. In the last century, we have learned more about science and the creation of the universe, than everything that was known before the twentieth century. What is more notable, the last decade has opened new discoveries leading to new theories that give us unique hypotheses about the presence of God and the nature of the universe.

Today’s article will discuss some of the most famous scientists in history who believed in God.

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

Albert Einstein

Arthur Compton (1892 – 1962)

Arthur Compton

Blaise Pascal (1623-1662)

Blaise Pascal

Ernst Haeckel (1834 –1919)

Ernst Haeckel

Erwin Schrödinger (1887 –1961)


Erwin Schrödinger

Francis Bacon (1561-1627)


Francis Bacon

Francis Collins (Born 1950)

Francis Collins

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)


Galileo Galilei

Gottfried Leibniz (1646 –1716)

Gottfried Leibniz

Gregor Mendel (1822-1884)

Gregor Mendel

Guglielmo Marconi (1874 –1937)

Guglielmo Marconi

Isaac Newton (1642-1727)

Isaac Newton

James Clerk Maxwell (1831 –1879)

James Clerk Maxwell

Johannes Kepler (1571-1630)

Johannes Kepler

John Eccles (1903 – 1997)

John Eccles

Louis Pasteur (1822-1895)

Louis Pasteur

Max Planck (1858-1947)

Max Planck

Michael Faraday (1791-1867)

Michael Faraday

Nicholas Copernicus (1473-1543)

Nicholas Copernicus

Rene Descartes (1596-1650)

Rene Descartes

Robert Boyle (1791-1867)

Robert Boyle

Robert A. Millikan (1868 – 1953)

Robert A. Millikan

Werner Heisenberg (1901 – 1976)

Werner Heisenberg

William Harvey (1578 –1657)

William Harvey

William Thomson Kelvin (1824-1907)

William Thomson Kelvin

14 Famous Scientists and Inventors who Experimented with Drugs

Author: Admin

scientists inventors creativity drugs recreational

Many famous scientists and inventors of all ages have admitted to taking psychedelic drugs. Some of them have even claimed that recreational drugs enhance creativity, inventiveness and intelligence, while others have gone one to advocate drug usage. Timothy Leary, the legendary American psychologist, philosopher and scientist, gained notoriety worldwide, during the 1960s and 1970s, for his advocacy of psychedelic drugs.

Today’s article on our Science Blog will talk about well-known scientific visionaries and inventors who experiment with drugs.

Andrew Weil – Morphine

Andrew Weil
Andrew Weil is widely credited as the founder of “integrative medicine”. Weil is open about his use of chocolate, morphine and other drugs. He also has a psychedelic mushroom, Psilocybe weilii, named after him.

Bill Gates — LSD

Bill Gates
This guy isn’t exactly an inventor, but certainly one of the most important entrepreneurs in the personal computer revolution. In an interview with Playboy, Gates has admitted using LSD in his “errant youth”.

Carl Sagan — Marijuana

Carl Sagan
Probably the most influential astrophysicist and cosmologist in history, Carl Sagan not only smoked but advocated use of marijuana in his 1971 book Marijuana Reconsidered.

Francis Crick — LSD

Francis Crick
The legendary molecular biologist Francis Crick had told his Cambridge fellow, Dick Kemp, that he surprisingly had “perceived the double-helix shape while on LSD.”

John C. Lilly — LSD, Ketamine

John C. Lilly
Neurocientist John Cunningham Lilly was the most important figure in the field of electronic brain stimulation. He extensively experimented with LSD and ketamine.

Kary Mullis — LSD

Kary Mullis
Kary Banks Mullis was an American biochemist who won the 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for making valuable improvements to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Mullies once told California Monthly that he “took plenty of LSD”.

Paul Erdös — Amphetamines

Paul Erdös
Paul Erdös was a leading Hungarian mathematician and a highly prolific author. Known for his eccentric personality, reportedly wasn’t able to get any mathematical work done for almost a month when he quit taking amphetamine as he’d made a $500 bet with his friend Ronald Graham.

Ralph Abraham – LSD/ Other

Ralph Abraham
Ralph Abraham is a prominent American mathematician. In an interview with GQ magazine, Abraham discussed how psychedelic insights had helped influence his mathematical theories. He took LSD and other psychedelic drugs.

Richard Feynman — LSD, Marijuana, Ketamine

Richard Feynman
One of the greatest theoretical physicists in history, Richard Feynman briefly experimented with LSD, marijuana and ketamine.

Sigmund Freud — Cocaine

Sigmund Freud
The great Austrian neurologist and founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud described cocaine as a “wonder drug”. He also used marijuana until his death in 1996.

Stephen Jay Gould – Marijuana

Stephen Jay Gould
Famous American American paleontologist and evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould had reportedly been using marijuana since 1982 until his death in 2002.

Steve Jobs — LSD

Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs, arguably the most revered pioneer in the personal computer revolution, once stated that experimenting with LSD in the 1960s was “one of the two or three most important things he had done in his life.”

Thomas Alva Edison — Cocaine Elixers

Thomas Alva Edison
The most famous and prolific inventor in history, Thomas Alva Edison frequently used “Vin Mariani”, a Bordeaux wine treated with coca leaves invented by French chemist Angelo Mariani.

Timothy Leary – LSD/ Other

Timothy Leary
As we have mentioned above, Timothy Leary, remains of the most popular consumers and advocates of LSD. He also frequently used mushrooms.

25 Famous Australian Scientists and their Contributions

Author: Admin

australian science telescopes

The development of Australian science in pre-war era was dependent on the individual achievements of a few famous scientists. Several of the famous Australian scientists went abroad for better facilities, better payoffs and more recognition.

Throughout the last two decades, this situation has drastically changed. Appealing rewards have been given to Australian scientists, and research facilities have been greatly improved. What’s more, the great reputation of Australian scientific work is pulling in many foreign scientifics as well.

Today’s article talks about the most famous Australian scientists and inventors throughout history and their extraordinary contributions.

Elizabeth Blackburn

Elizabeth Blackburn

Biological researcher who helped discover an enzyme called telomerase.

Isobel Bennett

Isobel Bennett

Marine biologist and prolific author; also known for helping William John Dakin with his book Australian Seashores.

Dorothy Hill

Dorothy Hill

Geologist and researcher; best known for being the first female professor at an Australian university.

William Lawrence Bragg and William Henry Bragg

William Lawrence Bragg and William Henry Bragg

Father and son who successfully constructed the first X-ray spectroscope, revolutionizing the study of X-ray crystallography.

Frank Macfarlane Burnet

Frank Macfarlane Burnet

Virologist highly regarded for his contributions to immunology.

Graeme Clark

Graeme Clark

Doctor and researcher who helped develop the Bionic Ear.

Ian Clunies Ross

Ian Clunies Ross

Highly influential scientist who is also known as the “architect of Australia’s scientific boom”.

Peter C. Doherty

Peter C. Doherty

Veterinary surgeon known for his research in the field of medicine.

John Eccles

John Eccles

Neurophysiologist who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on the synapse; the junction between two neurons or a neuron and a muscle.

Frank Fenner

Frank Fenner

Virologist known for his work on the prevention of smallpox and the rabbit plague by introducing the Myxoma virus.

Fred Hollows

Fred Hollows

Ophthalmologist known for his extraordinary work that helped in restoring eyesight of thousands of people.

Bernard Katz

Bernard Katz

Biophysicist and Nobel laureate known for his work on nerve biochemistry.

Priscilla Kincaid-Smith

Priscilla Kincaid-Smith

Physician noted for her research work in nephrology.

Douglas Mawson

Douglas Mawson

Geologist and explorer who led the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration.

Mark Oliphant

Mark Oliphant

Physicist noted for his work that led to the first public demonstration of nuclear fusion.

Henry Harris

Henry Harris

Professor and researcher noted for his work on cancer and human genetics.

David Karoly

David Karoly

Researcher known for his work on climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion.

Bruce Edward Hobbs

Bruce Edward Hobbs

Structural geologist and a research fellow at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.

Basil Hetzel

Basil Hetzel

Nutritionist and researcher known for his work on combating iodine deficiency.

Alf Howard

Alf Howard

Researcher and explorer who is the last surviving participants of the expedition to Antarctica in 1929-1931.

John R. Philip

John R. Philip

Soil physicist highly regarded for his research work on the movement of water, energy and gases.

Albert Pugsley

Albert Pugsley

Agricultural scientist and highly influential wheat breeder.

John O. Limb

John O. Limb

Engineer and researcher who helped develop digital video communications.

W. A. S. Butement

W. A. S. Butement

Defence scientist best known for his extraordinary contributions in the development of radar in England during World War II.

15 Famous Indian Scientists and their Inventions

Author: Admin

From C. V. Raman to Salim Ali, the talents of Indian scientists and inventors have been fully established in many different areas, including physics, medicine, mathematics, chemistry and biology. Some of them have also contributed in a substantial way to advanced scientific research in many different regions of the world.

This article will discuss the famous Indian scientists and inventors throughout history and their wonderful contributions.

Prafulla Chandra Ray

Prafulla Chandra Ray

Famous academician and chemist, known for being the founder of Bengal Chemicals & Pharmaceuticals, India’s first pharmaceutical company.

Salim Ali

Salim Ali

Naturalist who helped develop Ornithology; also known as the “birdman of India”.

Srinivasa Ramanujan

Srinivasa Ramanujan

Mathematician known for his brilliant contributions to contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series and continued fractions.

C. V. Raman

C. V. Raman

Physicist who won Nobel Prize in 1930 for his Raman Effect.

Homi Jehangir Bhabha

Homi Jehangir Bhabha

Theoretical physicist; best known as the chief architect of the Indian atomic energy program.

Jagadish Chandra Bose

Jagadish Chandra Bose

Physicist, biologist and archaeologist who pioneered the investigation of radio and microwave optics.

Satyendra Nath Bose

satyendra nath bose

Mathematician and physicist; best known for his collaboration with Albert Einstein in formulating a theory related to the gaslike qualities of electromagnetic radiation.

A.P.J. Abdul Kalam

A.P.J. Abdul Kalam

Known for his crucial role in the development of India’s missile and nuclear weapons programs.

Har Gobind Khorana

har gobind khorana

Biochemist who won the Nobel Prize in 1968 for demonstrating how the nucleotides in nucleic acids control the synthesis of proteins.

S.S. Abhyankar

S.S. Abhyankar

Mathematician; famous for his outstanding contributions to algebraic geometry.

Meghnad Saha

Meghnad-Saha

Astrophysicist who developed the Saha equation, which explains chemical and physical conditions in stars.

Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar

Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar

Astrophysicist won the Nobel Prize in 1983 for his research on the evolutionary stages of massive stars.

Raj Reddy

Raj Reddy

A.M. Turing Award-winning computer scientist, best known for his work related to large scale artificial intelligence systems.

Birbal Sahni

Birbal Sahni

Paleobotanist known for his research on the fossils of the Indian subcontinent.

Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis

Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis

Statistician and physicist who founded the Indian Statistical Institute.

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